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Santa Monica Mirror - Oct 28th, 2008

Once again, the Green Initiative Humanitarian Fashion Show proves that you can look good and save the earth all at the same time. We all know recycling matters and to say no to that terrible plastic bag, but we don�t always equate our clothes with being eco- friendly, or unfriendly, as the case may be. The story of that wool sweater in your closet, or even a simple cotton T-shirt, is not as harmless as you might think. The pesticides used to grow cotton are higher than any other crop, and many sheep endure a lot of cruelty in the name of fashion. According to Mikey Koffman, head of The Gallery Los Angeles, the firm that mounts the ambitious Green Initiative show, �Buying recycled wares are critical to our environment in the fact that purchasing these remade goods actually keeps tons of useable materials out of our landfills. In an era where everything has become disposable, we have done a major disservice to our planet by not finding alternative uses for old or outdated goods. This phenomenon has sparked the creativity of designers in all fields to stand up and take notice of how to apply something as simple as recycling into an art form. Today you will see clothing designers remaking garments from old clothing, jewelry, outdated fabrics, etc. Not to mention the use of old pieces of buildings and highways in new home constructions and pod houses. If every industry would band together and agree to first look to potential uses for old supplies and materials, this world would be a much better place.� Unlike most fashion shows, last week�s Green Initiative show at Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week at Smashbox Studios in Culver City had a feeling of community and warmth. Models walked down the runway, smiling and looking at people in the crowd, while authen- tic entertainment performed before the collection of each designer � which included M the Movement, ecoSkin, and lilikoi � was shown. Emily factor, sister of Smashbox founders Dean and Davis Factor, showed for the first time. Though it�s hard to pick favorites, Kathleen Plate of Smart Glass really stole the show, if you don�t count the wolf, snake, or monkey from ecoSkin. Plate�s recycled glass accessories adorned all the collections, and included huge red earrings made from a broken vase and one-of- a-kind necklaces. Her glass dresses included a wedding gown with a train, and show what recycling and ingenuity can create.

 

 

 

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